The Magic of Bechamel Sauce | Food & Cooking | TORN
The Magic of Bechamel Sauce
    • Arduan [2109024]
    • Role: Civilian
    • Level: 100
    • Posts: 92
    • Karma: 104
    • Last Action: 5 hours
      • 0
    • Reason:
      Are you sure you want to report this post to staff?
      Cancel
    Thread created on 11:30:04 - 05/04/18 (6 years ago)
    |
    Last replied 22:13:29 - 07/04/18 (6 years ago)
    My previous post was on crepes (what we call pancakes though in the Netherlands). Today I would like to discuss Bechamel sauce. 

    First, what is it?

    Its basically a milk sauce that has been made to thicken. So milk is the main ingredient. The thickening happens by means of what chefs call a roux. (Dont panic, its easy to make). The result is a white sauce, and its the white half of a Lasagna. The cool thing though is that you can use a Bechamel for WAAAY more than making Lasagna.

    How do you make it?

    First, we need to make a roux which is a mix of butter (40 per cent) and flour (60 per cent) that has been briefly cooked in a pan. How long you cook it for changes the colour and thats why chefs talk about a white roux (not cooked), a blonde roux (half cooked) and a brown roux (fully cooked). If your roux turns black, you can guess you have been cooking it WAAAAY too long :-). EDIT: as Blunt pointed out this might not be the best ratio of butter and flour, so maybe go for 50/50.

    So, put some butter in a pan and let it melt. As soon as it has melted add the flour and whisk it around so that you end up with what looks like cookie dough. You dont have to whisk it hard. Just enough so that the whole thing mixes and has time to dry out and change colour. No need to put the gas on high, take your time, and do it on slow heat.

    Next, have some milk ready and pour in milk. I do this on sight. Im sure people do this using measures as well, if you are so inclined. I usually pour in the quantity of milk that I want the sauce to be. Keep whisking and let the sauce heat up. Only when the sauce starts getting to the cooking point will you see it thicken. So don't worry when it doesnt thicken in the beginning. It wont, since its chemistry.

    During the whisking I add a couple of ingredients: salt, pepper, maybe nutmeg, a bit of a chicken bouillon cube, and a teaspoon of mustard. Why? Because so far all your sauce contains is butter, milk, flour. Although thats not a bad combo, it also does not taste like a yummy sauce. So you need to add flavour!

    Final step, when it has thickened, take it off the heat. Grab an egg, crack it, leave the yoke in the shell and decant the egg white into a bowl. Put the yoke without the white in the sauce and mix it in. Put the white in the fridge and make an omelette with it the next day (or whatever).

    I hear Duke say, why the egg? No reason really, except that it makes your sauce look smoother. More like restaurant style magic-ness.

    So thats our sauce done. If you want a Lasagna, also make Bolognaise Sauce...**** it, look up the recipe for Lasagna on the Internet, because today we arent making Lasagna!

    So what else can we do with the sauce? The sky is the limit. One of my favourites is to braise leeks. Easy. Cut some leeks in pieces, throw them in a casserole (that has a lid) with some butter and let it fry for a couple of minutes. Then pour a glass of water on it so that there is a layer of water on the bottom. For taste put a laurel leaf on top. Cover with the lid and put it on a low heat. When its it all tender, remove the laurel leaf, chuck all the leeks in the sauce (or the sauce in the leeks, however you want to do it), et voila you have a dish that is totally awesome and yummy.
    Last edited by Arduan on 17:14:25 - 07/04/18
    • Mudbottom [1879891]
    • Role: Wiki Contributor
    • Level: 100
    • Posts: 4,631
    • Karma: 3,465
    • Last Action: 3 months
      • 0
    • Reason:
      Are you sure you want to report this post to staff?
      Cancel
    Posted on 02:17:17 - 06/04/18 (6 years ago)
    Post link copied to clipboard Copy post link
    Somehow I've never gotten around to trying leeks, but it does sound yummy.

    Bechemel is indeed quite important and very versatile. Any type of pasta bake, gratins, chowders can all start with this sauce.

    Agree 100% that controlling your heat is a key to success. I check the thickness by how much it sticks to the spoon I'm stirring with. Definitely NOT something you can take you eye off and come back in 10min to see if it's done.
    • McDallas [14757]
    • Role: Civilian
    • Level: 94
    • Posts: 8,155
    • Karma: 8,294
    • Last Action: 1 hour
      • 0
    • Reason:
      Are you sure you want to report this post to staff?
      Cancel
    Posted on 13:26:13 - 06/04/18 (6 years ago)
    Post link copied to clipboard Copy post link
    I make bechamel all the time. I never understand why anyone would put store bought white sauce on their pasta, when bechamel is the most simplest easiest sauce and so much better to make yourself than buy crap in a bottle. 

    Yeah, I don't bother with all that fancy schmancy and egg stuff.

    Melt butter

    Put a spoonful or so of flour

    Mix to cookie dough

    Add milk and whisk hard

    Add some vegetable bouillon, herbs, etc

    Done.

    Then if it's for whatever I add fried mushrooms, spinach, chili, cheese, fresh rosemary, tomatoes then pour over whatever it is.
    • Arduan [2109024]
    • Role: Civilian
    • Level: 100
    • Posts: 92
    • Karma: 104
    • Last Action: 5 hours
      • 0
    • Reason:
      Are you sure you want to report this post to staff?
      Cancel
    Posted on 17:06:17 - 06/04/18 (6 years ago)
    Post link copied to clipboard Copy post link

    Mudbottom [1879891]

    Somehow I've never gotten around to trying leeks, but it does sound yummy.

    Bechemel is indeed quite important and very versatile. Any type of pasta bake, gratins, chowders can all start with this sauce.

    Agree 100% that controlling your heat is a key to success. I check the thickness by how much it sticks to the spoon I'm stirring with. Definitely NOT something you can take you eye off and come back in 10min to see if it's done.
    Thanks for the reply! Yeah, Im a big fan of leeks myself. Love it in soups, but it can stand on its own very well.

    Pasta bakes! Yum. I often pour it on pasta as well although I dont bother making a bake" of it. One of my favourites is to put peas and beans (from a can) into the sauce and then pour it on top of spirulini pasta.
    • Arduan [2109024]
    • Role: Civilian
    • Level: 100
    • Posts: 92
    • Karma: 104
    • Last Action: 5 hours
      • 0
    • Reason:
      Are you sure you want to report this post to staff?
      Cancel
    Posted on 17:06:58 - 06/04/18 (6 years ago)
    Post link copied to clipboard Copy post link

    McDallas [14757]

    I make bechamel all the time. I never understand why anyone would put store bought white sauce on their pasta, when bechamel is the most simplest easiest sauce and so much better to make yourself than buy crap in a bottle.

    Yeah, I don't bother with all that fancy schmancy and egg stuff.

    Melt butter

    Put a spoonful or so of flour

    Mix to cookie dough

    Add milk and whisk hard

    Add some vegetable bouillon, herbs, etc

    Done.

    Then if it's for whatever I add fried mushrooms, spinach, chili, cheese, fresh rosemary, tomatoes then pour over whatever it is.
    Those are some crazy options at the end haha
    • McDallas [14757]
    • Role: Civilian
    • Level: 94
    • Posts: 8,155
    • Karma: 8,294
    • Last Action: 1 hour
      • 0
    • Reason:
      Are you sure you want to report this post to staff?
      Cancel
    Posted on 17:32:25 - 06/04/18 (6 years ago)
    Post link copied to clipboard Copy post link

    McDallas [14757]

    I make bechamel all the time. I never understand why anyone would put store bought white sauce on their pasta, when bechamel is the most simplest easiest sauce and so much better to make yourself than buy crap in a bottle.

    Yeah, I don't bother with all that fancy schmancy and egg stuff.

    Melt butter

    Put a spoonful or so of flour

    Mix to cookie dough

    Add milk and whisk hard

    Add some vegetable bouillon, herbs, etc

    Done.

    Then if it's for whatever I add fried mushrooms, spinach, chili, cheese, fresh rosemary, tomatoes then pour over whatever it is.

    Arduan [2109024]

    Those are some crazy options at the end haha
    Hehe yeah. I'm about to make some bechamel sauce now. Gonna add rosemary and mushrooms, then have it over linguine.
    • Blunt [2076337]
    • Role: Civilian
    • Level: 100
    • Posts: 3,774
    • Karma: 5,781
    • Last Action: 43 minutes
      • 0
    • Reason:
      Are you sure you want to report this post to staff?
      Cancel
    Posted on 18:00:44 - 06/04/18 (6 years ago)
    Post link copied to clipboard Copy post link
    Not sure if anyone else mentioned this (as I only read the OP), but there are a few intricacies missing from the directions on how to make a béchamel (and how to make/use a roux in general) that would really help a novice cook achieve perfection

    - First (and foremost), when thickening anything using roux, you ALWAYS want to cook the roux first. For béchamel, it doesn't need to be cooked very long, but a good 1-2 min should be enough to cook the raw flour taste out of the end resulting sauce. A lot of inexperienced cooks will think that, simply because the flour and butter have been properly mixed, that they can move onto the next step, which isn't the case. If you don't cook the roux for at least a few minutes, no amount of cooking or seasoning will rid your sauce of the taste of raw flour

    -Second, If your making the roux, then immediately adding the milk, make sure to turn your heat off before adding the milk, then SLOWLY add WARM (100 degree Fahrenheit or more) milk while whisking. If your roux is hot, your liquid needs to be hot as well to prevent clumping and you turn the heat off when adding liquid to prevent burning to the bottom, and itll make for a smoother finished texture also. The opposite is true as well, if your roux is cold, so should your liquid be, so the end sauce is as smooth as possible without lumps.

    -Third, your 40/60 ratio butter to flour is a bit tricky for an inexperienced cook. Not that your incorrect at all, because as you said, making a roux and then adding liquid by eye is how I do it for optimum texture, but for someone who lacks experience, a good rule of thumb is 1Tbsp butter, 2.5Tbsp flour, 1 cup of liquid. This will make a thicker roux than a 40/60 mix, but the end result will be a perfect thickness for a béchamel. With a 40/60, the roux is still a bit loose, meaning you need more roux to thicken the same amount of liquid, which could lead to the béchamel breaking (fats separating from suspension) due to a higher fat content. The only downfall to using more flour to butter, is that the roux NEEDS to have that full 2 minutes to cook to remove the flour taste. If that is rushed or skipped, it will ruin the flavor of the sauce.

    4. Mustard powder is a better option than using regular mustard. Mustard has extremely high levels of acids that will work against the fat in the béchamel, preventing the luxurious mouth-feel of the fine fats trapped in suspension in the sauce. Acid works its way in between fats, causing them to push together into larger globules, which will change the mouth-feel of the sauce and could help cause breaking of the sauce. Mustard powder will give the background mustard taste without effecting the texture of the sauce as a whole.

    5. Adding an egg yolk isn't "classic" béchamel, but wont hurt the end result at all. I would just be sure to temper my yolk before adding it into a hot béchamel though, or youll end up with chunks of yolk in the final product, which, again, would work against mouth-feel and overall texture
    • Arduan [2109024]
    • Role: Civilian
    • Level: 100
    • Posts: 92
    • Karma: 104
    • Last Action: 5 hours
      • 0
    • Reason:
      Are you sure you want to report this post to staff?
      Cancel
    Posted on 19:53:11 - 06/04/18 (6 years ago)
    Post link copied to clipboard Copy post link

    Blunt [2076337]

    Not sure if anyone else mentioned this (as I only read the OP), but there are a few intricacies missing from the directions on how to make a béchamel (and how to make/use a roux in general) that would really help a novice cook achieve perfection

    - First (and foremost), when thickening anything using roux, you ALWAYS want to cook the roux first. For béchamel, it doesn't need to be cooked very long, but a good 1-2 min should be enough to cook the raw flour taste out of the end resulting sauce. A lot of inexperienced cooks will think that, simply because the flour and butter have been properly mixed, that they can move onto the next step, which isn't the case. If you don't cook the roux for at least a few minutes, no amount of cooking or seasoning will rid your sauce of the taste of raw flour

    -Second, If your making the roux, then immediately adding the milk, make sure to turn your heat off before adding the milk, then SLOWLY add WARM (100 degree Fahrenheit or more) milk while whisking. If your roux is hot, your liquid needs to be hot as well to prevent clumping and you turn the heat off when adding liquid to prevent burning to the bottom, and itll make for a smoother finished texture also. The opposite is true as well, if your roux is cold, so should your liquid be, so the end sauce is as smooth as possible without lumps.

    -Third, your 40/60 ratio butter to flour is a bit tricky for an inexperienced cook. Not that your incorrect at all, because as you said, making a roux and then adding liquid by eye is how I do it for optimum texture, but for someone who lacks experience, a good rule of thumb is 1Tbsp butter, 2.5Tbsp flour, 1 cup of liquid. This will make a thicker roux than a 40/60 mix, but the end result will be a perfect thickness for a béchamel. With a 40/60, the roux is still a bit loose, meaning you need more roux to thicken the same amount of liquid, which could lead to the béchamel breaking (fats separating from suspension) due to a higher fat content. The only downfall to using more flour to butter, is that the roux NEEDS to have that full 2 minutes to cook to remove the flour taste. If that is rushed or skipped, it will ruin the flavor of the sauce.

    4. Mustard powder is a better option than using regular mustard. Mustard has extremely high levels of acids that will work against the fat in the béchamel, preventing the luxurious mouth-feel of the fine fats trapped in suspension in the sauce. Acid works its way in between fats, causing them to push together into larger globules, which will change the mouth-feel of the sauce and could help cause breaking of the sauce. Mustard powder will give the background mustard taste without effecting the texture of the sauce as a whole.

    5. Adding an egg yolk isn't "classic" béchamel, but wont hurt the end result at all. I would just be sure to temper my yolk before adding it into a hot béchamel though, or youll end up with chunks of yolk in the final product, which, again, would work against mouth-feel and overall texture
    Great comments and I totally agree.

    I always add cold milk though. I don't feel that this has ever been a bad idea. That said, my fridge isn't all that cold and I take the milk out before I start.

    I must perhaps add that I use Bechamel for different purposes, and that I adjust thickness accordingly. In my view, recipes must be worked with for a while, trying slightly different variations so that you feel what the range is of a certain dish. It's a bit like art. Like Van Gogh making studies of Sunflowers.

    Thank you for the comment about mustard. I didn't know that. I will try to find mustard powder and see what the difference is. I really love the taste of mustard in a Bechamel. Also a nice amount of pepper is essential for me.
    Last edited by Arduan on 20:03:19 - 06/04/18
    • Blunt [2076337]
    • Role: Civilian
    • Level: 100
    • Posts: 3,774
    • Karma: 5,781
    • Last Action: 43 minutes
      • 0
    • Reason:
      Are you sure you want to report this post to staff?
      Cancel
    Posted on 22:27:33 - 06/04/18 (6 years ago)
    Post link copied to clipboard Copy post link

    Blunt [2076337]

    Not sure if anyone else mentioned this (as I only read the OP), but there are a few intricacies missing from the directions on how to make a béchamel (and how to make/use a roux in general) that would really help a novice cook achieve perfection

    - First (and foremost), when thickening anything using roux, you ALWAYS want to cook the roux first. For béchamel, it doesn't need to be cooked very long, but a good 1-2 min should be enough to cook the raw flour taste out of the end resulting sauce. A lot of inexperienced cooks will think that, simply because the flour and butter have been properly mixed, that they can move onto the next step, which isn't the case. If you don't cook the roux for at least a few minutes, no amount of cooking or seasoning will rid your sauce of the taste of raw flour

    -Second, If your making the roux, then immediately adding the milk, make sure to turn your heat off before adding the milk, then SLOWLY add WARM (100 degree Fahrenheit or more) milk while whisking. If your roux is hot, your liquid needs to be hot as well to prevent clumping and you turn the heat off when adding liquid to prevent burning to the bottom, and itll make for a smoother finished texture also. The opposite is true as well, if your roux is cold, so should your liquid be, so the end sauce is as smooth as possible without lumps.

    -Third, your 40/60 ratio butter to flour is a bit tricky for an inexperienced cook. Not that your incorrect at all, because as you said, making a roux and then adding liquid by eye is how I do it for optimum texture, but for someone who lacks experience, a good rule of thumb is 1Tbsp butter, 2.5Tbsp flour, 1 cup of liquid. This will make a thicker roux than a 40/60 mix, but the end result will be a perfect thickness for a béchamel. With a 40/60, the roux is still a bit loose, meaning you need more roux to thicken the same amount of liquid, which could lead to the béchamel breaking (fats separating from suspension) due to a higher fat content. The only downfall to using more flour to butter, is that the roux NEEDS to have that full 2 minutes to cook to remove the flour taste. If that is rushed or skipped, it will ruin the flavor of the sauce.

    4. Mustard powder is a better option than using regular mustard. Mustard has extremely high levels of acids that will work against the fat in the béchamel, preventing the luxurious mouth-feel of the fine fats trapped in suspension in the sauce. Acid works its way in between fats, causing them to push together into larger globules, which will change the mouth-feel of the sauce and could help cause breaking of the sauce. Mustard powder will give the background mustard taste without effecting the texture of the sauce as a whole.

    5. Adding an egg yolk isn't "classic" béchamel, but wont hurt the end result at all. I would just be sure to temper my yolk before adding it into a hot béchamel though, or youll end up with chunks of yolk in the final product, which, again, would work against mouth-feel and overall texture

    Arduan [2109024]

    Great comments and I totally agree.

    I always add cold milk though. I don't feel that this has ever been a bad idea. That said, my fridge isn't all that cold and I take the milk out before I start.

    I must perhaps add that I use Bechamel for different purposes, and that I adjust thickness accordingly. In my view, recipes must be worked with for a while, trying slightly different variations so that you feel what the range is of a certain dish. It's a bit like art. Like Van Gogh making studies of Sunflowers.

    Thank you for the comment about mustard. I didn't know that. I will try to find mustard powder and see what the difference is. I really love the taste of mustard in a Bechamel. Also a nice amount of pepper is essential for me.
    Yea, I was a chef (and eventually a head chef) in Atlantic city since I was 16, so these are just a few of the more "sciency" details that can really take a bechamel over the top. 

    You CAN use cold milk, but what happens is the heat from the bottom will create a barrier of extremely hot milk, and cold milk. So the roux actually melts and tightens part of the milk, creates large chunks, that then have to be whisked longer to get them to incorporate back. That causes more air to enter the milk as it tightens, which makes the final product less smooth. It' like the differance between a cheap icecream, and an ultra premium icecream like haagen das. The amount of air in the final product distorts the creamy mouthfeel. And, not only that, but when the milk goes from cold to hot too fast, it can scorch, leaving a burnt taste, or that "heat barrier" will cause the bottom tightened milk to burn to the bottom if you don' begin whisking fast enough.

    Classically, white pepper and nutmeg would be the only spices used in a bech, and salt of course. But, I'm not a fan of nutmeg in a bech unless I'm using it for a pastitsio, and I like the look/taste of fresh cracked black pepper better than white pepper. And, I always add mustard powder to any form of dairy I'm cooking. Mustard powder just adds a subtle background flavor that enhances dairy without taking over
    • Soulseekster [2101810]
    • Role: Civilian
    • Level: 40
    • Posts: 5
    • Karma: 1
    • Last Action: 2 days
      • 0
    • Reason:
      Are you sure you want to report this post to staff?
      Cancel
    Posted on 22:48:30 - 06/04/18 (6 years ago)
    Post link copied to clipboard Copy post link
    I've noticed that making Bechamelsauce doesn't work that well using semi-skinned milk. Full milk seems to do it better. What is the reason for this?
    • Blunt [2076337]
    • Role: Civilian
    • Level: 100
    • Posts: 3,774
    • Karma: 5,781
    • Last Action: 43 minutes
      • 0
    • Reason:
      Are you sure you want to report this post to staff?
      Cancel
    Posted on 00:09:09 - 07/04/18 (6 years ago)
    Post link copied to clipboard Copy post link

    Soulseekster [2101810]

    I've noticed that making Bechamelsauce doesn't work that well using semi-skinned milk. Full milk seems to do it better. What is the reason for this?
    You can litterally thicken ANY liquid with a roux. In fact, 3 of the 5 "mother sauces" are made using a roux, and are the 3 sauces that have the most versatility of the 5 as well.

    But, when your talking bech, whole milk with a high milkfat work best. It has the highest protein count and highest fat content, both of which equal better flavor and mouth-feel. The differance is subtle, but very noticeable side by side. If I had to substitute, I'd use half n' half, or watered down heavy cream. I wouldn' use straight heavy cream, only because that' TOO much fat, which can be overbearing texturally
    Last edited by Blunt on 11:10:38 - 07/04/18
    • Arduan [2109024]
    • Role: Civilian
    • Level: 100
    • Posts: 92
    • Karma: 104
    • Last Action: 5 hours
      • 0
    • Reason:
      Are you sure you want to report this post to staff?
      Cancel
    Posted on 16:48:57 - 07/04/18 (6 years ago)
    Post link copied to clipboard Copy post link
    We are totally geeking out here now :-) Technically, 4 of the 5 Mother Sauces can be made with Roux, but for the 4th one the Roux isn't essential while for the first three it is. The 5th is a completely different sauce.

    Roux essential: Bechamel (roux and dairy), veloute (roux and white stock, e.g.. chicken), espagnole (roux and brown stock, e.g. beef).

    Roux optional: tomato sauce (roux and tomatoes).

    Without Roux: Hollandaise (egg yolks, clarified or even regular butter, wine or even water)

    Why are they called Mother Sauces? Because if you know all of these sweet ladies you can make A LOT more. For instance add cheese to the Bechamel and you get a Mornay sauce. Hollandaise leads to Mayo-naise, Bear-naise (easy to remember) etc.

    As you can see, what all of the Mother Sauces sauces have in common is a CENTRAL ingredient, and then something to make the sauce thicken. Therefore, a Bechamel is a MILK sauce, Veloute and Espagnole are STOCK sauces, Tomato sauce is a...TOMATO sauce (LOL), and a Hollandaise is a BUTTER sauce (hence those bad boys are very fattening). From this follows that the way of making them is the same as well: you first make the thickener (either a roux or an emulsion) and you then add the central ingredient.
    Last edited by Arduan on 17:10:47 - 07/04/18
    • Blunt [2076337]
    • Role: Civilian
    • Level: 100
    • Posts: 3,774
    • Karma: 5,781
    • Last Action: 43 minutes
      • 0
    • Reason:
      Are you sure you want to report this post to staff?
      Cancel
    Posted on 18:33:57 - 07/04/18 (6 years ago)
    Post link copied to clipboard Copy post link

    Arduan [2109024]

    We are totally geeking out here now :-) Technically, 4 of the 5 Mother Sauces can be made with Roux, but for the 4th one the Roux isn't essential while for the first three it is. The 5th is a completely different sauce.

    Roux essential: Bechamel (roux and dairy), veloute (roux and white stock, e.g.. chicken), espagnole (roux and brown stock, e.g. beef).

    Roux optional: tomato sauce (roux and tomatoes).

    Without Roux: Hollandaise (egg yolks, clarified or even regular butter, wine or even water)

    Why are they called Mother Sauces? Because if you know all of these sweet ladies you can make A LOT more. For instance add cheese to the Bechamel and you get a Mornay sauce. Hollandaise leads to Mayo-naise, Bear-naise (easy to remember) etc.

    As you can see, what all of the Mother Sauces sauces have in common is a CENTRAL ingredient, and then something to make the sauce thicken. Therefore, a Bechamel is a MILK sauce, Veloute and Espagnole are STOCK sauces, Tomato sauce is a...TOMATO sauce (LOL), and a Hollandaise is a BUTTER sauce (hence those bad boys are very fattening). From this follows that the way of making them is the same as well: you first make the thickener (either a roux or an emulsion) and you then add the central ingredient.
    Exactly correct. There are a few other classic sauces that aren't considered mother sauces, but are also excellent bases to make other things. Buerre Blanc/Rouge come to mind, which would simply be a reduction of wine or vinegar, thickened by "mounting" with butter. Not an official mother sauce, but the "mounting" process is something that can be used as a means to make quite a few interesting sauces. Pesto, being a sauce that is thickened via emulsion, but is nothing more than any green leaf, cheese, oil, and nut blended together.

    All very versatile, all very easy (except hollandaise... man is that a lot of work, but nothing compares to a good Charon sauce or bernaise with your seafood/steak) and all of them take under 5 ingredients to make. But now that I think on it, almost every sauce possible is either loose, or thickened via reduction, a roux, or emulsion. So if you can master the 5 mother sauces, all other sauces (even if they aren't related to one of the 5 mothers) should be fairly easy for you to make as well, once you understand the 3 main thickening principles, and how they work
    • Arduan [2109024]
    • Role: Civilian
    • Level: 100
    • Posts: 92
    • Karma: 104
    • Last Action: 5 hours
      • 0
    • Reason:
      Are you sure you want to report this post to staff?
      Cancel
    Posted on 20:21:19 - 07/04/18 (6 years ago)
    Post link copied to clipboard Copy post link
    Exactly on the money. If you don't make the tomato sauce with a roux then you have to let it reduce. That gives us three thickening principles, like you say: reduction, roux, and emulsion. And that opens up a splendid plethora of sauces.

    But enough about cooking now from me. The Force Awakens is on the tele :-)
    • CottonStone [2071689]
    • Role: Civilian
    • Level: 66
    • Posts: 126
    • Karma: 94
    • Last Action: 3 hours
      • 0
    • Reason:
      Are you sure you want to report this post to staff?
      Cancel
    Posted on 21:54:27 - 07/04/18 (6 years ago)
    Post link copied to clipboard Copy post link
    I love the entire thread, and will share with my oft cooking 16 year old daughter.  It could only help the happenings and eats in our humble home
    • Daisy3 [730750]
    • Role: Civilian
    • Level: 99
    • Posts: 15,786
    • Karma: 9,426
    • Last Action: 39 minutes
      • 0
    • Reason:
      Are you sure you want to report this post to staff?
      Cancel
    Posted on 22:13:29 - 07/04/18 (6 years ago)
    Post link copied to clipboard Copy post link
    I agree with CottonStone!  I love this thread.  Even an experienced cook (me) has learned quite a bit from here. :)

    4977f371-1a21-14ae-730750.png

Reply
Thread Title: