Artemis I Launch | Science | TORN
Artemis I Launch
    • Proxima [1879587]
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    Thread created on 10:46:37 - 16/11/22 (2 months ago)
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    Last replied 07:57:57 - 22/12/22 (1 month ago)
    This morning, at 6:47:44 UTC, Artemis I was successfully launched and put the humans back on the path to the Moon!!

    The Artemis program will eventually seek to establish a permanent base on the Moon, as well as facilitate future manned expeditions to Mars.

    Artemis I is an un-crewed Lunar-orbiting mission that will last almost 25 and a half days before returning to Earth on the 11th of december. The first crewed mission will be Artemis II, scheduled for 2024. Artemis III will see the first human landing on the moon since 1972, where astronauts will attempt to land in the South-Polar region and stay for approximately a week.

    "Artemis Generation, this is for you"




    xghFJLH.gif
    • Bumfluff [969606]
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    Posted on 11:28:11 - 16/11/22 (2 months ago)
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    FUN FACT: NASA's return-to-the-moon program is called Artemis, named after the goddess of Greek mythology who was the twin sister of Apollo.

    • Skellington [2671472]
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    Posted on 12:02:09 - 16/11/22 (2 months ago)
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    To what purpose are they going to put people on the moon?
    • Andyman [471591]
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    Posted on 13:46:45 - 16/11/22 (2 months ago)
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    Skellington [2671472]

    To what purpose are they going to put people on the moon?
    The real reason: To mine Helium-3 before the Chinese do. 
    • Skellington [2671472]
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    Posted on 13:54:49 - 16/11/22 (2 months ago)
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    Skellington [2671472]

    To what purpose are they going to put people on the moon?

    Andyman [471591]

    The real reason: To mine Helium-3 before the Chinese do.
    So money then.
    • Vladar [1996140]
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    Posted on 13:59:23 - 16/11/22 (2 months ago)
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    Skellington [2671472]

    To what purpose are they going to put people on the moon?
    Because it’s cool AF

    You realize the sun don't go down
    It's just an illusion caused by the world spinning round

    • White-Rabbit [1908720]
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    Posted on 14:07:43 - 16/11/22 (2 months ago)
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    Moon Base!
    Last edited by White-Rabbit on 14:07:53 - 16/11/22
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    Posted on 14:16:44 - 16/11/22 (2 months ago)
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    Skellington [2671472]

    To what purpose are they going to put people on the moon?
    The aim is to use it as a base of operations to aid journeys to Mars.

    • Maitane [2715671]
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    Posted on 14:26:55 - 16/11/22 (2 months ago)
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    • Skellington [2671472]
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    Posted on 14:30:16 - 16/11/22 (2 months ago)
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    Skellington [2671472]

    To what purpose are they going to put people on the moon?

    Bumfluff [969606]

    The aim is to use it as a base of operations to aid journeys to Mars.
    I wish they'd put as much effort and money in preserving earth as they put in conquering space. Or perhaps even instead of conquering space. They way things are developing we're not going to exist long enough to find out if journeys to Mars are even possible.
    Last edited by Skellington on 14:52:36 - 16/11/22
    • Andyman [471591]
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    Posted on 15:40:35 - 16/11/22 (2 months ago)
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    Skellington [2671472]

    To what purpose are they going to put people on the moon?

    Bumfluff [969606]

    The aim is to use it as a base of operations to aid journeys to Mars.

    Skellington [2671472]

    I wish they'd put as much effort and money in preserving earth as they put in conquering space. Or perhaps even instead of conquering space. They way things are developing we're not going to exist long enough to find out if journeys to Mars are even possible.
    That's what the Helium-3 is for, actually. It's potentially the perfect fuel for nuclear fusion reactors. 

    There's also huuuuge economic value related to the relatively big jumps in the advancement of technology and materials science from these challenging endeavors. Entire industries were created from space programs of the past. Just the inventions of freeze dried food, velcro, and power drills (all products of the space programs of the past) have outright paid for the entire space program in economic efficiency value. Tires, photovoltaics, and fire-proofing materials also took a massive leap forward, among many other things!
    Last edited by Andyman on 17:27:22 - 16/11/22
    • Skellington [2671472]
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    Posted on 16:39:39 - 16/11/22 (2 months ago)
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    Skellington [2671472]

    To what purpose are they going to put people on the moon?

    Bumfluff [969606]

    The aim is to use it as a base of operations to aid journeys to Mars.

    Skellington [2671472]

    I wish they'd put as much effort and money in preserving earth as they put in conquering space. Or perhaps even instead of conquering space. They way things are developing we're not going to exist long enough to find out if journeys to Mars are even possible.

    Andyman [471591]

    That's what the Helium-3 is for, actually. It's potentially the perfect fuel for nuclear fusion reactors.

    There's also huuuuge economic value related to the relatively big jumps in the advancement of technology and materials science from these challenging endeavors. Entire industries were created from space programs of the past. Just the inventions of freeze dried food, velcro, and power drills (all products of the space programs of the past) have outright paid for the entire space program in economic efficiency value. Tires, photovoltaics, and fire-proofing materials also took a massive leap forward, among many other things!
    Potentially indeed. There is no way of telling if the extraction of Helium-3 will succeed, let alone when it will be possible to actually use reactors run by helium-3. And even if so, that is all well and good, but that is not exactly saving our earth at the moment. Instead of looking for new sources of energy to be able to still satisfy our absurd demand a few decades from now, we might be better off trying to preserve the world by dramatically decreasing our demand, so that new energy source might not even be needed in the first place. I'm not an environmental maniac, but it seems we have more pressing matters to attend to than trying to outrun fellow money- and power driven countries. Sadly that requires an effort from the entire world, which, given the hunger for power and money, is a utopia. 

    Btw, looking at the leaps you mention, those products aren't exactly all sustainable, so in a way the space race helped in the ongoing destruction of earth.

    *edit - made a mess of the logical sequence in the paragraph
    Last edited by Skellington on 17:02:12 - 16/11/22
    • Andyman [471591]
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    Posted on 17:26:50 - 16/11/22 (2 months ago)
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    Skellington [2671472]

    To what purpose are they going to put people on the moon?

    Bumfluff [969606]

    The aim is to use it as a base of operations to aid journeys to Mars.

    Skellington [2671472]

    I wish they'd put as much effort and money in preserving earth as they put in conquering space. Or perhaps even instead of conquering space. They way things are developing we're not going to exist long enough to find out if journeys to Mars are even possible.

    Andyman [471591]

    That's what the Helium-3 is for, actually. It's potentially the perfect fuel for nuclear fusion reactors.

    There's also huuuuge economic value related to the relatively big jumps in the advancement of technology and materials science from these challenging endeavors. Entire industries were created from space programs of the past. Just the inventions of freeze dried food, velcro, and power drills (all products of the space programs of the past) have outright paid for the entire space program in economic efficiency value. Tires, photovoltaics, and fire-proofing materials also took a massive leap forward, among many other things!

    Skellington [2671472]

    Potentially indeed. There is no way of telling if the extraction of Helium-3 will succeed, let alone when it will be possible to actually use reactors run by helium-3. And even if so, that is all well and good, but that is not exactly saving our earth at the moment. Instead of looking for new sources of energy to be able to still satisfy our absurd demand a few decades from now, we might be better off trying to preserve the world by dramatically decreasing our demand, so that new energy source might not even be needed in the first place. I'm not an environmental maniac, but it seems we have more pressing matters to attend to than trying to outrun fellow money- and power driven countries. Sadly that requires an effort from the entire world, which, given the hunger for power and money, is a utopia.

    Btw, looking at the leaps you mention, those products aren't exactly all sustainable, so in a way the space race helped in the ongoing destruction of earth.

    *edit - made a mess of the logical sequence in the paragraph
    To clarify, technology is definitely the answer toward future sustainability. Technology has been proven to come from these endeavors (and war, unfortunately... but exploration is arguably better than war any day!)

    The demand-driven approach to sustainability has been proven over and over again to not work, mainly because it's s simply not enforceable worldwide and our willingness to sacrifice our comfort levels just isn't viable. No one wants to give up air travel, eating cheap meat, pay huge energy bills for electricity at night, etc. Even then, reducing demand just bides time, it doesn't actually reverse our course of destruction.

    We need clean energy storage + clean energy generation today, no question.... but we're also going to need an insane amount of energy 40-50 years from now to clean up the atmospheric mess our parents/grandparents left us with, and for that we're going to need something like fusion-generated electricity combined with electrolysis to make storable hydrogen and remove carbon from their air. (Solar and nuclear may also work given enough concentration)
    • Skellington [2671472]
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    Posted on 18:19:29 - 16/11/22 (2 months ago)
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    Skellington [2671472]

    To what purpose are they going to put people on the moon?

    Bumfluff [969606]

    The aim is to use it as a base of operations to aid journeys to Mars.

    Skellington [2671472]

    I wish they'd put as much effort and money in preserving earth as they put in conquering space. Or perhaps even instead of conquering space. They way things are developing we're not going to exist long enough to find out if journeys to Mars are even possible.

    Andyman [471591]

    That's what the Helium-3 is for, actually. It's potentially the perfect fuel for nuclear fusion reactors.

    There's also huuuuge economic value related to the relatively big jumps in the advancement of technology and materials science from these challenging endeavors. Entire industries were created from space programs of the past. Just the inventions of freeze dried food, velcro, and power drills (all products of the space programs of the past) have outright paid for the entire space program in economic efficiency value. Tires, photovoltaics, and fire-proofing materials also took a massive leap forward, among many other things!

    Skellington [2671472]

    Potentially indeed. There is no way of telling if the extraction of Helium-3 will succeed, let alone when it will be possible to actually use reactors run by helium-3. And even if so, that is all well and good, but that is not exactly saving our earth at the moment. Instead of looking for new sources of energy to be able to still satisfy our absurd demand a few decades from now, we might be better off trying to preserve the world by dramatically decreasing our demand, so that new energy source might not even be needed in the first place. I'm not an environmental maniac, but it seems we have more pressing matters to attend to than trying to outrun fellow money- and power driven countries. Sadly that requires an effort from the entire world, which, given the hunger for power and money, is a utopia.

    Btw, looking at the leaps you mention, those products aren't exactly all sustainable, so in a way the space race helped in the ongoing destruction of earth.

    *edit - made a mess of the logical sequence in the paragraph

    Andyman [471591]

    To clarify, technology is definitely the answer toward future sustainability. Technology has been proven to come from these endeavors (and war, unfortunately... but exploration is arguably better than war any day!)

    The demand-driven approach to sustainability has been proven over and over again to not work, mainly because it's s simply not enforceable worldwide and our willingness to sacrifice our comfort levels just isn't viable. No one wants to give up air travel, eating cheap meat, pay huge energy bills for electricity at night, etc. Even then, reducing demand just bides time, it doesn't actually reverse our course of destruction.

    We need clean energy storage + clean energy generation today, no question.... but we're also going to need an insane amount of energy 40-50 years from now to clean up the atmospheric mess our parents/grandparents left us with, and for that we're going to need something like fusion-generated electricity combined with electrolysis to make storable hydrogen and remove carbon from their air. (Solar and nuclear may also work given enough concentration)
    I do not disagree with you there, as long as people remain people, there is no hope for a short term solution, if one at all. The race to 3-He proves this abundantly. What I'm saying is that there might not be enough time to develop those reactors at all. Which is why,  and yes, I know it's a utopia, we should attend to earth first. I also realize we are in dire need of clean, sustainable energy for which technology is, essentially at least, the answer. But that only holds true if it is used wisely and prioritized. I don't see that happen any time soon tbh. Btw, clean energy is nice, but considering the size of the reactors needed for 3-He and their projected net gain, from what is known now, it's interesting to try to calculate how clean it actually is.
    • Wave [2680263]
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    Posted on 07:03:10 - 12/12/22 (1 month ago)
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    Bumfluff [969606]

    FUN FACT: NASA's return-to-the-moon program is called Artemis, named after the goddess of Greek mythology who was the twin sister of Apollo.
    Another fun fact, Artemis is the Greek goddess of Moon and Hunting, where as Appollo is the green god of Sun

    I do not carry any money, Do not bother mugging for 4k from travel money

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    Posted on 22:16:41 - 12/12/22 (1 month ago)
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    waste of money... spending billions to send people to a barren rock which at best has some scientific geological value while people are starving. Also, whatever tech you can get from this kind of thing has already come and gone. The rate these satellites are going out of action nobody will be going anywhere anytime soon anyway.
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    Posted on 07:57:57 - 22/12/22 (1 month ago)
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    power_ [2840756]

    waste of money... spending billions to send people to a barren rock which at best has some scientific geological value while people are starving. Also, whatever tech you can get from this kind of thing has already come and gone. The rate these satellites are going out of action nobody will be going anywhere anytime soon anyway.
    You think we’ve reached our potential for space travel tech??

    I agree we are basically reinventing the wheel here, but 1972 was a long time ago, and since then we had basically given up on human space travel. We need to get back to where we were in order to advance.

    Whether or not we space travel today, or throw all the money spent on that at our problems instead, isn’t going to fix it anyway. Kind of like giving a man a fish, or teaching him to fish.
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