Science/Physics/Math/Engineering help - Page 2 | Science | TORN
Science/Physics/Math/Engineering help
  • TRM DarkLightCrusaD [2563226]DarkLightCrusaD [2563226]
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    Posted on 23:39:22 - 28/11/20 (10 months ago)
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    878thBattleCat [2021453]

    I have a question: The speed of light is constant no matter where your frame of reference is, right?
    So if you travel at the speed of light, and look over to me, who is also travel at the speed of light, where am I to you? Waaaay ahead, side by side, or waaaaay behind you?

    I think you just opened a can of worm buddy.

    DarkLightCrusaD [2563226]

    I will be honest. I don't know the answer to this. Theoretical physics is not my specialty.

    However, I think that if we were both going the speed of light then either neither of us would be able to observe the other because light couldn't travel between us, or you would appear stationary in the location I saw you in when I reached the speed of light (your velocity would appear to be 0 relative to a stationary reference point).

    Mechanical engineers tend to deal with things that have been proven and are tangible, so this is not something that is covered in any classes. This was touched on in my college level physics classes in high school, which is why I was even able to guess. If you have heard a different answer from an astrophysicist then I would love for you to share your source so I can learn.

    Bertknight [2595713]

    Is Langrangian mechanics taught?
    I do not believe that Lagrangian mechanics is taught to MEs explicitly, however after a quick search it seems as though all of the prerequisite knowledge required to understand it is taught.
  • "=" Sweeney_Todd [27468]Sweeney_Todd [27468]
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    Posted on 00:04:24 - 29/11/20 (10 months ago)
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    If the speed of light is the fixed speed of existance, how can E=MC2 exist? 

    I will never lie to you. What I say is how I feel...

  • C2C jetwagon284 [2088372]jetwagon284 [2088372]
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    Posted on 19:48:56 - 10/12/20 (10 months ago)
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    Couple questions from a current high school student:
    1) if I want to eventually get a career doing CAD, is ME the best degree to get, or should I look at other options?
    2) what kind of career are you/your classmate looking to get after college?
    3) are there any well-known ME colleges in the pacific northwest (British Columbia, Oregon, Washington, and northern California)?
  • TRM DarkLightCrusaD [2563226]DarkLightCrusaD [2563226]
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    Posted on 00:11:34 - 19/12/20 (10 months ago)
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    jetwagon284 [2088372]

    Couple questions from a current high school student:
    1) if I want to eventually get a career doing CAD, is ME the best degree to get, or should I look at other options?
    2) what kind of career are you/your classmate looking to get after college?
    3) are there any well-known ME colleges in the pacific northwest (British Columbia, Oregon, Washington, and northern California)?
    1) As far as I am aware, every program has different levels of CAD. My school had a lot of CAD. I would say ME is a good option, but look for a school that has a big focus on hands on learning because that makes all the difference. However, if you want to focus almost entirely on CAD then look into drafting degrees. That will focus more closely on design principles.
    2) I have a friend who wants to become an automotive engineer, another one for aerospace. I'm still undecided, but I've done a lot of work towards bionic and I might go towards that. I have focused a lot on material science, but just from going through the require classes I've become proficient in CAD. ME gives you a lot of doors to go through, but if you dont have the right mindset for it, then it will be extremely difficult regardless of how smart you are. ME is very general so I don't know where I want to take it because it has given me so many options. I guess my real goal is to work with NASA on planetary rovers.
    3) I live in the south east so I dont know any schools up there, but I found this website. Definately, do your own research, but I have always assumed Californian would have great ME schools because of all of the military contractors, but you will have to find the school that fits your personal needs. https://www.collegefactual.com/majors/engineering/me-mechanical-engineering/rankings/top-ranked/far-western-us/washington/

    I hope this was useful and good luck.
  • MMCP pustak [2597273]pustak [2597273]
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    Posted on 17:33:28 - 31/12/20 (9 months ago)
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    How does Russian Roulette have a 1/2 probability of winning?

    Going from what I know of probability. It should be:
    For the person going first-
    1/6 × 1/4 × 1/2
    = 1/48
    For the person going second-
    1/5 × 1/3 × 1/1
    = 1/15
    So the person going first has a HUGE advantage right?
    But looking around my grade 10 math textbook it seems that only independent probability is multiplicative. And this is clearly not independent. So how do I arrive at the conclusion that Russian Roulette is 50:50?
    Last edited by pustak on 17:35:12 - 31/12/20

  • *DP* Lewri [1762864]Lewri [1762864]
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    Posted on 01:31:01 - 01/01/21 (9 months ago)
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    pustak [2597273]

    How does Russian Roulette have a 1/2 probability of winning?

    Going from what I know of probability. It should be:
    For the person going first-
    1/6 × 1/4 × 1/2
    = 1/48
    For the person going second-
    1/5 × 1/3 × 1/1
    = 1/15
    So the person going first has a HUGE advantage right?
    But looking around my grade 10 math textbook it seems that only independent probability is multiplicative. And this is clearly not independent. So how do I arrive at the conclusion that Russian Roulette is 50:50?
    That last shot may have a 1 in 1 chance of killing the player, but you're forgetting to take into account the fact that it is only a 1 in 6 chance of it getting to that point, so a 1 in 6 chance of them dying from that shot. The first shot is a 1 in 6 chance of them dying, but 1 in 1 probability of them taking it, so 1 in 6 chance of them dying. Similarly for all the shots, it ends up being 1 in 6 once you take into account the probability of them having to take the shot.

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