What makes glass so stable? | Science | TORN
What makes glass so stable?
    • Matchlock [2227514]
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    Thread created on 09:44:59 - 20/03/19 (5 years ago)
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    Last replied 03:20:00 - 26/04/19 (4 years ago)
    Title says it all. What makes glass so stable?
    • Assassin_Sean [2224030]
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    Posted on 16:28:34 - 22/03/19 (5 years ago)
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    The molecules of the glass stays put
    • BlnkSugarSocket [2018522]
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    Posted on 12:43:55 - 24/03/19 (5 years ago)
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    Glass is a liquid crystal. You can learn more about the properties of liquid crystals here: https://www.britannica.com/science/liquid-crystal
    • Lewri [1762864]
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    Posted on 17:09:55 - 24/03/19 (5 years ago)
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    BlnkSugarSocket [2018522]

    Glass is a liquid crystal. You can learn more about the properties of liquid crystals here: https://www.britannica.com/science/liquid-crystal
    What? I'm pretty sure glass is a non-crystalline amorphous solid...
    Glass has neither the properties of a crystal or a liquid. 
    Last edited by Lewri on 17:12:40 - 24/03/19

    • BlnkSugarSocket [2018522]
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    Posted on 22:56:45 - 24/03/19 (5 years ago)
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    I try to speak to my audience. Glass isn't stable, and it tends to shatter. 

    So to answer the question, "Why is glass stable?", rather than being rude and challenging the premise, I offered a similar premise, that, if challenged, would not only help the OP learn the difference between glass and liquid crystals, s/he will also learn why the disordered molecular arrangement of glass makes  it less stable than liquid crystals. Liquid crystals are currently used in conjunction with glass for so-called "smart glass", able to become transparent or not when electricity is applied to it.

    "Glass is stable because its a liquid crystal," seemed appropriate. The falsity of both sides of the equation cancel out, making the statement at least funny. 

    To learn about glass, and how it differs from liquid crystals, here: http://www.math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/General/Glass/glass.html
    • Lewri [1762864]
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    Posted on 03:06:59 - 25/03/19 (5 years ago)
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    BlnkSugarSocket [2018522]

    I try to speak to my audience. Glass isn't stable, and it tends to shatter.

    So to answer the question, "Why is glass stable?", rather than being rude and challenging the premise, I offered a similar premise, that, if challenged, would not only help the OP learn the difference between glass and liquid crystals, s/he will also learn why the disordered molecular arrangement of glass makes  it less stable than liquid crystals. Liquid crystals are currently used in conjunction with glass for so-called "smart glass", able to become transparent or not when electricity is applied to it.

    "Glass is stable because its a liquid crystal," seemed appropriate. The falsity of both sides of the equation cancel out, making the statement at least funny. 

    To learn about glass, and how it differs from liquid crystals, here: http://www.math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/General/Glass/glass.html
    Im pretty sure OP is just trying to ask why glass has a low reactivity (I'm not a chemist so not entirely sure of the technical difference between chemical stability and reactivity). I don't see how your comment could have possibly helped.

    • BlnkSugarSocket [2018522]
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    Posted on 12:51:22 - 25/03/19 (5 years ago)
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    I didn't interpret  the question as "Why is glass thermodynamically stable?", or "Why is glass chemically stable?", but rather "Why is glass stable (in terms of its physical position)?"

    To ask one of the first two questions is something akin to asking, "Why doesn't glass rust or oxidise?"

    If I am wrong, and he was, in fact, asking why glass doesn't rust, I'll gladly concede to having misunderstood the question.
    Last edited by BlnkSugarSocket on 13:11:31 - 25/03/19
    • Assassin_Sean [2224030]
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    Posted on 03:07:02 - 28/03/19 (5 years ago)
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    BlnkSugarSocket [2018522]

    Glass is a liquid crystal. You can learn more about the properties of liquid crystals here: https://www.britannica.com/science/liquid-crystal

    Lewri [1762864]

    What? I'm pretty sure glass is a non-crystalline amorphous solid...
    Glass has neither the properties of a crystal or a liquid. 
    yep i agree
    • JollyGarcia [494677]
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    Posted on 01:52:19 - 18/04/19 (5 years ago)
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    To get closure from this glass is an amorphous solid. It doesn't have the same crystalline lattice: http://www.graylark.com/eve/lattices.html
    that youd expect. Since glass is cooled so quickly the molecules don't have time to arrange themselves in a lattice structure. What defines it as a solid is that the molecules are so strongly bonded together that the they can't slide around (at room temperature).

    Interestingly enough if you look at the mantle of the earth with "liquid" magma even as it flows around it is still technically in the solid state. How do we know this? Because when you measure earthquakes around the earth the wave propagates through the center. The molten middle, which is a liquid, will not propagate the wave. The lava portion, however, does. I could go into more detail on this but the moral of the story is that liquids will start to flow and "ruin" the wave where solids will actually replace displaced atoms essentially causing a 'wave' transfer of atoms through the solid.


    EDIT:

    To answer the main point of the post. The chemical bonds between the molecules are so strong it stops them from sliding past eachother.
    Last edited by JollyGarcia on 01:58:25 - 18/04/19
    • Kitty420 [383500]
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    Posted on 02:28:20 - 18/04/19 (5 years ago)
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    Why are you all doing this kid's homework?

    • Tuck68 [2166525]
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    Posted on 17:40:55 - 18/04/19 (5 years ago)
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    Actually, glass does possess properties similar to a liquid however it takes ages before these properties become apparent. This is why you can look at windows in old churches and the windows are thicker at the bottom than at the top. As far as I’m aware (and I may be wrong here) we have managed to create glass that undergoes this process at even slower rates but even so, glass is still not technically a solid despite it possessing many attributes common in solid matter. Also, I’m still kind of new here so I’m not sure how to reply to others comments directly. Sorry.
    • Jaaxx [2269997]
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    Posted on 09:51:46 - 20/04/19 (5 years ago)
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    Tuck68 [2166525]

    Actually, glass does possess properties similar to a liquid however it takes ages before these properties become apparent. This is why you can look at windows in old churches and the windows are thicker at the bottom than at the top. As far as I’m aware (and I may be wrong here) we have managed to create glass that undergoes this process at even slower rates but even so, glass is still not technically a solid despite it possessing many attributes common in solid matter. Also, I’m still kind of new here so I’m not sure how to reply to others comments directly. Sorry.
    Bill Nye the science guy

    • Lewri [1762864]
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    Posted on 15:28:16 - 20/04/19 (5 years ago)
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    Tuck68 [2166525]

    Actually, glass does possess properties similar to a liquid however it takes ages before these properties become apparent. This is why you can look at windows in old churches and the windows are thicker at the bottom than at the top. As far as I’m aware (and I may be wrong here) we have managed to create glass that undergoes this process at even slower rates but even so, glass is still not technically a solid despite it possessing many attributes common in solid matter. Also, I’m still kind of new here so I’m not sure how to reply to others comments directly. Sorry.
    No.

    • Tuck68 [2166525]
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    Posted on 23:53:58 - 21/04/19 (5 years ago)
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    Tuck68 [2166525]

    Actually, glass does possess properties similar to a liquid however it takes ages before these properties become apparent. This is why you can look at windows in old churches and the windows are thicker at the bottom than at the top. As far as I’m aware (and I may be wrong here) we have managed to create glass that undergoes this process at even slower rates but even so, glass is still not technically a solid despite it possessing many attributes common in solid matter. Also, I’m still kind of new here so I’m not sure how to reply to others comments directly. Sorry.

    Lewri [1762864]

    No.
    My bad man. Though he did contradict himself towards the end of the video by saying both glass and the mantle were viscous after spending the first part of the video saying they were solid. But the rest of it makes sense
    • Viracocha [1772040]
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    Posted on 00:37:14 - 22/04/19 (5 years ago)
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    BlnkSugarSocket [2018522]

    I try to speak to my audience. Glass isn't stable, and it tends to shatter.

    So to answer the question, "Why is glass stable?", rather than being rude and challenging the premise, I offered a similar premise, that, if challenged, would not only help the OP learn the difference between glass and liquid crystals, s/he will also learn why the disordered molecular arrangement of glass makes  it less stable than liquid crystals. Liquid crystals are currently used in conjunction with glass for so-called "smart glass", able to become transparent or not when electricity is applied to it.

    "Glass is stable because its a liquid crystal," seemed appropriate. The falsity of both sides of the equation cancel out, making the statement at least funny. 

    To learn about glass, and how it differs from liquid crystals, here: http://www.math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/General/Glass/glass.html

    Lewri [1762864]

    Im pretty sure OP is just trying to ask why glass has a low reactivity (I'm not a chemist so not entirely sure of the technical difference between chemical stability and reactivity). I don't see how your comment could have possibly helped.
    It has to do things with like Atomic Radius, Number of Valence Electrons, Nuclear Force, London Force, Electronegativity and Ionization Energy.

    The Noble Gases are non reactive. The halogens and alkaline metals and alkaline earth metals are the most reactive.

    It all comes down to the stable octet.  Funny societies are not to dissimilar in how shall I say, their reactivity to unstable elements.

    Have a Great Day!

    • Lewri [1762864]
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    Posted on 22:19:29 - 25/04/19 (4 years ago)
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    Tuck68 [2166525]

    Actually, glass does possess properties similar to a liquid however it takes ages before these properties become apparent. This is why you can look at windows in old churches and the windows are thicker at the bottom than at the top. As far as I’m aware (and I may be wrong here) we have managed to create glass that undergoes this process at even slower rates but even so, glass is still not technically a solid despite it possessing many attributes common in solid matter. Also, I’m still kind of new here so I’m not sure how to reply to others comments directly. Sorry.

    Lewri [1762864]

    No.

    Tuck68 [2166525]

    My bad man. Though he did contradict himself towards the end of the video by saying both glass and the mantle were viscous after spending the first part of the video saying they were solid. But the rest of it makes sense
    Granite also has viscosity at standard room temperature and pressure, doesn't mean it's not solid.

    • Viracocha [1772040]
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    Posted on 22:23:44 - 25/04/19 (4 years ago)
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    Tuck68 [2166525]

    Actually, glass does possess properties similar to a liquid however it takes ages before these properties become apparent. This is why you can look at windows in old churches and the windows are thicker at the bottom than at the top. As far as I’m aware (and I may be wrong here) we have managed to create glass that undergoes this process at even slower rates but even so, glass is still not technically a solid despite it possessing many attributes common in solid matter. Also, I’m still kind of new here so I’m not sure how to reply to others comments directly. Sorry.

    Lewri [1762864]

    No.

    Tuck68 [2166525]

    My bad man. Though he did contradict himself towards the end of the video by saying both glass and the mantle were viscous after spending the first part of the video saying they were solid. But the rest of it makes sense

    Lewri [1762864]

    Granite also has viscosity at standard room temperature and pressure, doesn't mean it's not solid.
    Interesting.  Was this peer reviewed do you know?

    Stable consistent 25C temperature?

    Have a Great Day!

    • Lewri [1762864]
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    Posted on 22:42:04 - 25/04/19 (4 years ago)
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    Tuck68 [2166525]

    Actually, glass does possess properties similar to a liquid however it takes ages before these properties become apparent. This is why you can look at windows in old churches and the windows are thicker at the bottom than at the top. As far as I’m aware (and I may be wrong here) we have managed to create glass that undergoes this process at even slower rates but even so, glass is still not technically a solid despite it possessing many attributes common in solid matter. Also, I’m still kind of new here so I’m not sure how to reply to others comments directly. Sorry.

    Lewri [1762864]

    No.

    Tuck68 [2166525]

    My bad man. Though he did contradict himself towards the end of the video by saying both glass and the mantle were viscous after spending the first part of the video saying they were solid. But the rest of it makes sense

    Lewri [1762864]

    Granite also has viscosity at standard room temperature and pressure, doesn't mean it's not solid.

    Viracocha [1772040]

    Interesting. Was this peer reviewed do you know?

    Stable consistent 25C temperature?
    It was published in Journal of the Society of Materials Science, Japan, so it will have been peer reviewed. The paper is open access, but unfortunately only the abstract and figures are in English, it appears there were temperature variations, but these also seem to have been accounted for in the analysis.

    • Viracocha [1772040]
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    Posted on 23:12:33 - 25/04/19 (4 years ago)
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    Tuck68 [2166525]

    Actually, glass does possess properties similar to a liquid however it takes ages before these properties become apparent. This is why you can look at windows in old churches and the windows are thicker at the bottom than at the top. As far as I’m aware (and I may be wrong here) we have managed to create glass that undergoes this process at even slower rates but even so, glass is still not technically a solid despite it possessing many attributes common in solid matter. Also, I’m still kind of new here so I’m not sure how to reply to others comments directly. Sorry.

    Lewri [1762864]

    No.

    Tuck68 [2166525]

    My bad man. Though he did contradict himself towards the end of the video by saying both glass and the mantle were viscous after spending the first part of the video saying they were solid. But the rest of it makes sense

    Lewri [1762864]

    Granite also has viscosity at standard room temperature and pressure, doesn't mean it's not solid.

    Viracocha [1772040]

    Interesting. Was this peer reviewed do you know?

    Stable consistent 25C temperature?

    Lewri [1762864]

    It was published in Journal of the Society of Materials Science, Japan, so it will have been peer reviewed. The paper is open access, but unfortunately only the abstract and figures are in English, it appears there were temperature variations, but these also seem to have been accounted for in the analysis.
    well as the temperature increases, the bonds weaken.

    I'll explore this further later. I love chemistry

    Have a Great Day!

    • BlnkSugarSocket [2018522]
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    Posted on 03:20:00 - 26/04/19 (4 years ago)
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    There is no clear answer to the question "Is glass solid or liquid?".  In terms of molecular dynamics and thermodynamics it is possible to justify various different views that it is a highly viscous liquid, an amorphous solid, or simply that glass is another state of matter that is neither liquid nor solid.  The difference is semantic. In terms of its material properties we can do little better.  There is no clear definition of the distinction between solids and highly viscous liquids.  All such phases or states of matter are idealisations of real material properties. Nevertheless, from a more common sense point of view, glass should be considered a solid since it is rigid according to everyday experience.  The use of the term "supercooled liquid" to describe glass still persists, but is considered by many to be an unfortunate misnomer that should be avoided.  In any case, claims that glass panes in old windows have deformed due to glass flow have never been substantiated.  Examples of Roman glassware and calculations based on measurements of glass visco-properties indicate thatthese claims cannot be true.  The observed features are more easily explained as aresult of the imperfect methods used to make glass window panes before the float glass process was invented. http://www.math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/General/Glass/glass.html
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