Camp vs CS degree? | Technology | TORN
Camp vs CS degree?
    • quentin [128941]
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    Thread created on 02:13:55 - 25/04/22 (9 months ago)
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    Last replied 06:53:08 - 17/07/22 (6 months ago)
    So I have been a cook or in sales most my life. I’m 32 years old and I never want to cook for a living again. I have always wanted to learn to code or do something in tech. Long story short I’m learning python on a app called Sololearn. I am also take a course in umedy on data science. So far I am understanding everything and at times it can be challenging but it’s ok and I’m still interested in what I am learning. 


    I am constantly bombarded by ads for coding boot camps from universities that seems credible. I also see a few that that promise a job or you don’t pay. Or deferred payments of some sort. I am also considering going to college.

    Are these bootcamps legit or are they just scams?

    is the self taught stuff I’m a doing a waste of time and I just need to go to school or bootcamp?

    It is realistic for me to be able to learn coding at my age and get a job?


    I have had a few people tell me I’m not too old it’s just a long shot. Those same people said I need a degree or I’m just wasting time. A lot of them are people with 4 year degrees so maybe they are just telling me I need to do that.


    I also have a friend that works as a software engineer that is unsure about the bootcamps because he went the traditional route. However he is trying to do some looking into it for me. So far he said it largely what you can show in your portfolio and who you know.


    Any kind of insights are appreciated. I’m going to constantly strive to improve my life no matter what. I just wonder if what I am doing is to far of a stretch and should I be trying something else. I feel like I’m running out of time as I age.
    • Lewri [1762864]
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    Posted on 12:13:57 - 25/04/22 (9 months ago)
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    Make use of the resources here: https://www.reddit.com/r/learnpython/wiki/index

    Learn some Git basics and build a Github portfolio as you go along with examples of things you've done. I won't comment on feasibility of getting a dev job as I don't actually work in the field.

    Camps of course vary in quality, I've never done any so I can't say which if any are worth doing.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/learnpython/comments/t2m2g3/from_a_beginner_to_beginners_learning_printhello/
    Last edited by Lewri on 12:22:20 - 25/04/22

    • Sheev [1522784]
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    Posted on 19:49:49 - 25/04/22 (9 months ago)
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    Bootcamps can be okay but they don't guarantee a job, you need to put additional legwork in to build a good portfolio up. I'm in the process of doing recruitment for a Web Dev position at my company and there are lots of applicants who've graduated from coding bootcamps recently and there is a lot of variance. 

    As the post above said, learn Git as well and build up some evidence of your journey through learning to code. Having a bootcamp on your resume can also work in your favor, some employers value self-starters.
    • Laughingman91 [2044206]
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    Posted on 20:54:36 - 25/04/22 (9 months ago)
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    the self taught stuff is the only stuff you'll probably ever learn, education and degrees suck balls (i got one lel). I didn't learn shit getting my degree, they don't teach you in university they just expect you to pass exams and projects. So you gotta teach yourself like you already are. I would totally go with one of those no-job no-pay bootcamps, cos then you can actually learn on the job and get experience - most jobs will value experience much more than book-smarts and a piece of paper that says degree on it. Employers wanna see a portfolio or a catalogue of stuff you coded. Keep going bro you can make it!
    • quentin [128941]
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    Posted on 21:51:46 - 25/04/22 (9 months ago)
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    Thank you so much for your feed back.

    It is an intimidating thing to do. I feel like I’m that big ol dummy trying to do something I have no business doing.

    It’s quite a challenge so far however, it has been very cool to work at. I am still very early in the process so the advise about portfolio building is very helpful. I will look into that ASAP.


    I also appreciate the words of encouragement. I don’t expect this to be a easy or friendly pathway. Thank you very much.


    I’ll keep checking this thread for more feedback and maybe another player will find this information helpful as well. There is a ton of info on google. However it all seems to come with a sales pitch and not just some honest feedback.
    • Mist3rM [2154120]
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    Posted on 01:43:34 - 30/04/22 (9 months ago)
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    From a hiring perspective I will tell you that when it comes to hiring people it is my experience that the people that were self taught out performed the people that had the degrees.  Learning standards and the security side of development helps.  

    I have a degree in Cybersecurity which I got late in my career; the whole time I just kept thinking these classes are not preparing these people for anything.

    If you are finding this to be enjoyable and you like learning it. Go for it, do what you love so you never have to cook again. People saying you are to old can go pound sand, no sense in being miserable for the rest of your life.

    • OingyBoingy [2753672]
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    Posted on 20:47:48 - 30/04/22 (9 months ago)
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    quentin [128941]

    So I have been a cook or in sales most my life. I’m 32 years old and I never want to cook for a living again. I have always wanted to learn to code or do something in tech. Long story short I’m learning python on a app called Sololearn. I am also take a course in umedy on data science. So far I am understanding everything and at times it can be challenging but it’s ok and I’m still interested in what I am learning.


    I am constantly bombarded by ads for coding boot camps from universities that seems credible. I also see a few that that promise a job or you don’t pay. Or deferred payments of some sort. I am also considering going to college.

    Are these bootcamps legit or are they just scams?

    is the self taught stuff I’m a doing a waste of time and I just need to go to school or bootcamp?

    It is realistic for me to be able to learn coding at my age and get a job?


    I have had a few people tell me I’m not too old it’s just a long shot. Those same people said I need a degree or I’m just wasting time. A lot of them are people with 4 year degrees so maybe they are just telling me I need to do that.


    I also have a friend that works as a software engineer that is unsure about the bootcamps because he went the traditional route. However he is trying to do some looking into it for me. So far he said it largely what you can show in your portfolio and who you know.


    Any kind of insights are appreciated. I’m going to constantly strive to improve my life no matter what. I just wonder if what I am doing is to far of a stretch and should I be trying something else. I feel like I’m running out of time as I age.
    Both are good tbh.

    Codecamps are more focused on practical knowledge,

    While in your degree you learn a lot of other things to help in other areas such as Teamwork, communication skills, presentation skills, research etc.

    Of course you can learn all that from self-taught and code camp options too, but for some it's easier to get overwhelmed.

    However, when it comes to landing the jobs, it's your portfolio (Projects, Assignments, Research) and of course overall attitude and likeability that helps you stand out. It's easy to be smart, but if you give off an unfriendly or loner vibe, you might not get the call back (not all the time though lol)

    I'd say continue following your passion. Neither is wrong, but yes a uni degree will give you a SLIGHT advantage when it comes to jobs, because your tech background is "validated" I guess (not sure what to use there)

    But if you're coming from a non-tech degree and did camps, then you'll need a good portfolio to help you stand out. Once you have that, even people with degrees have no advantage over you. But it's a lot of commitment, so be ready.

    Edit: Forgot to add, the parts where bootcamps guarantee you a job after, that isn't true. It's a big lie. Maybe some might help you get interviews, but don't ever bank on that. Jobs will be gotten from your skills
    Last edited by OingyBoingy on 20:49:14 - 30/04/22

    • Jaxtra [2658631]
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    Posted on 06:53:08 - 17/07/22 (6 months ago)
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    A degree will give you a major advantage if there is another crisis like the early 2000s IT crash. People without degrees were the first ones to get kicked out during those days.

    During normal times, it's more about skills than degrees. A degree will make it easier to get your first job, but if you have some other way to demonstrate your skills that is fine too. Second and n:th job is all about experience and skills.

    Most important is to make sure you have those skills. If you do, you will find a job.
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